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Guide Parts of a Ship

Discussion in 'Ship Modeling' started by Post Captain, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Hylie Pistof

    Hylie Pistof Curmudgeon Staff Member QA Tester Storm Modder

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    Flying oliphaunts? Bombs away! :rolleyes:

    In POTC we cannot model the tack, only the sheet. The location where the sheet attaches to the hull is determined more by where one wants the sail to end up than anything else. The attachment point has to be a certain distance below and behind the bottom of the sail.
    In fact many modelers attach the sheets to the keel!
     
  2. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    I realize the limitations of the game. In this case, I think that it's still semi-useful information, especially at the end, even though we won't really be able to do much with it.
     
  3. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    I'll be updating the topic soon with a subject of your choice: Lifting and Depressing Sails, which had a significant impact on the speed and handling of a square rigger, or Sailing in Extreme Weather, which would include scudding and lying to. I plan to get both subjects done, but I'll start with the one you're most interested in.

    Both topics should impact the sailing dynamics in the new Unreal Project.
     
  4. Hylie Pistof

    Hylie Pistof Curmudgeon Staff Member QA Tester Storm Modder

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    Hmm. What would be most immediately useful? Lifting and depressing sails?
     
  5. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    Probably. Lifting sails could just be assigned +5% speed bonuses or something of the sort, while depressing sails could be assigned a similar speed reduction.
     
  6. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    Lifting and Depressing Sails
    (note that this only applies to full-rigged ships as presented)

    Lifting sails exerted upward force on the bow of the vessel, reducing heeling (in turn increasing speed) and the amount of steering required to hold a course. They also had a positive effect on the vessel's speed.

    These sails included all fore and aft heads'ls, The fore course (which had the greatest effect), and the Main stays'ls (which had the least effect).

    Depressing sails exerted an upwards force on the stern, which in turn exerted a downwards force on the bow. This would increase heeling and increase the amount of steering required to hold a course. These sails generally reduced speed.

    These sails included all sails not mentioned above as being lifting sails, excluding the spanker. The spanker did not have a significant effect one way or the other.

    The greatest speeds could be achieved when these sails were set in the proper ratio, which differed from vessel to vessel.

    When assigning values to sails for the Unreal project, feel free to ask me about proper bonuses or speed reductions.


    Lifting sails in other rigs:
    Brig: Fores'l, heads'ls
    Schooner/ketch: heads'ls
    Sloop: heads'ls
    Cutter: heads'ls that are forward of the vessel's center of mass

    Depressing sails in other rigs:
    Brig: All Square sails except fores'l
    Schooner/Ketch: All square sails, excluding running courses
    Sloop: See schooner/ketch
    Cutter: See schooner/ketch
     
  7. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    Standing-to and scudding will be delayed so that I'll be able to compose the accompanying sketches.
     
  8. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    Oops. Just got the urge to do at least one of the drawings in very nice watercolor. Now it's going to have to wait until I get back from Pilgrim.

    Edit: leaving on the 23rd, 5:00 PM PST, gone for next two weeks. If you have any questions feel free to PM me. I should have cell phone reception near the beginning and end of the trip, so I'll be checking in every so often.
     
  9. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    Update: I have all my drawings illustrating the process of scudding finished. Now to find the time to upload them...
     
  10. AndyK

    AndyK Sailor Apprentice

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    Very good sir, i just took a quick look and i have to say very well done. If i will ever model any ship this is a good start
     
  11. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    Update: Real life and HoO have gotten in the way of any further progress here. I'll still take requests.
     
  12. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    [​IMG]
    For future reference- Hawsers entering deck.
     
  13. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    Xebec Stuff:

     
  14. Admiral

    Admiral Sea Dog

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    Great work :onya
     
  15. Post Captain

    Post Captain Seamanship Advisor Coordinator QC Advisor Storm Modder

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    [​IMG]
    Rudder well and rudder post on Lady Washington. The rudder appears to be chocked so that it can't move. (That's the block of unpainted wood in the center of the picture.)
     

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